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What are you reading now?

Started by Zombie Kaczynski, January 25, 2009, 02:44:46 AM

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Mr. Blackwell

Quote from: maritime on February 28, 2022, 04:05:35 PM
Quote from: maritime on February 16, 2022, 04:28:37 PM
The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Read like a screen play (turns out it was).
In all my reading had never considered that actual act, the tattooing, the tattooist.
The book was a love story (mush).

1984 was a love story.
At this time the answer is not no. The question is why?

GratefulApe

Started reading Laptop From Hell by Miranda Devine. It's not a long book at all but I had to put it down for a bit. The debauchery in Hunters life is a bit off-putting.

Shnozzola

#1172
Quote from: Mr. Blackwell on March 02, 2022, 03:03:50 AM
Quote from: LoriPinkAngel on March 01, 2022, 05:01:16 PM
Quote from: Shnozzola on November 14, 2021, 03:15:28 AM


Several of these were actually required reading when I was in school.

Same here. I've read all but one on that list. For the one I did not read, I saw the movie starring Jack Nicholson. When, how, in what way and for how long were they banned?

Interestingly, I dug into 1 book banning, "Cuckoo's nest", and ended up in Alaska with a letter on why the Juneau theater wouldn't be doing the play:
https://www.ptalaska.org/a-change-to-our-2019-2020-season/

It's worth digging into every book banning reason.

All these books get banned, unbanned, rebanned, optionally banned, etc all the time. (All the info is from searched opinions)

Here are 4 more:

Mockingbird
https://crosscut.com/news/2022/01/kill-mockingbird-hot-seat-wa-school-district

Aimal farm
Unlike other books which may be banned for several reasons, there's really only one main reason that Animal Farm has ever been banned: the critique of Communism.Dec 7, 2021

In Fahrenheit 451, books were banned in an attempt to keep society happy, or so they were told, believing that if people did not have to form opinions for themselves, there would be less conflict, and society would be happier.Dec 13, 2021.......In the years since its publication, Fahrenheit 451 has occasionally been banned, censored, or redacted in some schools at the behest of parents or teaching staff either unaware of or indifferent to the inherent irony in such censorship.

1984 is not a banned book anymore. However, it was repeatedly banned in the past for the following reasons:-

The book essentially gives us a glimpse of what the world will look like in a future where people are deprived of free will, privacy and truth. (HEAR, HEAR, YES, EVERY PERSON SHOULD READ THIS BOOK. CHILDREN SHOULD BE MADE TO ANALYSE IT IN SCHOOLS.)
Ironically, the myriad  of "god" beliefs of humanity are proving to be more dangerous than us learning that we are on our own, making the way we treat each other far more important

GratefulApe

Exploring Nature - Activity Book for Kids by Kim Andrews

50 creative projects to spark curiosity in the outdoors   ||cool||

Meat

#1174
Quote from: GratefulApe on March 04, 2022, 12:55:08 AM
Started reading Laptop From Hell by Miranda Devine. It's not a long book at all but I had to put it down for a bit. The debauchery in Hunters life is a bit off-putting.
C'mon man, everyone has a child like that in their family. Hunter is the smartest person Joe knows. CornPop is the toughest Joe knows. Kamala for best cackle and Jill for best dumb blonde.
"Brilliant Meat!" +1 (composer)
"Amen Meat." (Former Believer)
"Like Meat said." (Francis)
"Not brilliant, Meat!" — Villanelle
"Damned right Meat." -Kusa

GratefulApe

Quote from: Meat on March 06, 2022, 03:33:21 PM
Quote from: GratefulApe on March 04, 2022, 12:55:08 AM
Started reading Laptop From Hell by Miranda Devine. It's not a long book at all but I had to put it down for a bit. The debauchery in Hunters life is a bit off-putting.
C'mon man, everyone has a child like that in their family. Hunter is the smartest person Joe knows. CornPop is the toughest Joe knows. Kamala for best cackle and Jill for best dumb blonde.

But Donny had mean tweets!

Meat

Quote from: GratefulApe on March 06, 2022, 03:58:40 PM
Quote from: Meat on March 06, 2022, 03:33:21 PM
Quote from: GratefulApe on March 04, 2022, 12:55:08 AM
Started reading Laptop From Hell by Miranda Devine. It's not a long book at all but I had to put it down for a bit. The debauchery in Hunters life is a bit off-putting.
C'mon man, everyone has a child like that in their family. Hunter is the smartest person Joe knows. CornPop is the toughest Joe knows. Kamala for best cackle and Jill for best dumb blonde.

But Donny had mean tweets!
Donny looks like a genius compared to this old fart. I'd rather Donny not run in 2024 but......The foundation is certainly being laid. Everything Joey touches turns to $hit. I saw 5.99 diesel last night on a call. 5.99!!!!!!!
"Brilliant Meat!" +1 (composer)
"Amen Meat." (Former Believer)
"Like Meat said." (Francis)
"Not brilliant, Meat!" — Villanelle
"Damned right Meat." -Kusa

kevin

dare to know.

LoriPinkAngel

I feel so illiterate compared to you guys.  I read mostly fiction.  I guess I need the escapism from the stress of my job.  I am in the process of reading Fiona Hill's book There Is Nothing For You Here though.  I just finished Steven King's Lisey's Story and I am reading a book on mindfulness by Jon Kabat-Zinn titled Wherever You Go, There You Are.  I have really been trying to learn about and apply mindfulness but my mind races too much.
Ah, but I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now...  -Bob Dylan

Kiahanie

#1179
I have been reading Hill's book. She says it out loud. Very discouraging.
"If there were a little more silence, if we all kept quiet ... maybe we could understand something." --Federico Fellini....."Silence is the language of God, all else is poor translation" -Jellaludin Rumi,

maritime

I am going to pick up "One Damn Thing After Another: Memoirs of an Attorney General" by William Barr tomorrow.
North Star Polaris Sept 26, 2021 photo by JE

maritime

#1181
^Got it!

Plus a new Billy Collins book, Whale Day and other poems ||grin||
Plus Ledger, Poems by Jane Hirshfield Hirschfield(new to me)
North Star Polaris Sept 26, 2021 photo by JE

Kiahanie

Just ordered Woman, Eating.

Maritime-- has many books do you have open at one time?
"If there were a little more silence, if we all kept quiet ... maybe we could understand something." --Federico Fellini....."Silence is the language of God, all else is poor translation" -Jellaludin Rumi,

maritime

#1183
More than a few.

Artem Chebokha's art on cover of Whale Day poetry book by Collins (first one)
North Star Polaris Sept 26, 2021 photo by JE

Kiahanie

"If there were a little more silence, if we all kept quiet ... maybe we could understand something." --Federico Fellini....."Silence is the language of God, all else is poor translation" -Jellaludin Rumi,

GratefulApe

I'm still working on Laptop From Hell. I'm learning a lot about banking and how the Bidens corrupted Maryland real estate and banking. Maryland is where money goes to hide. Remember when Biden raised the CC debt interest into the 30% yeah that was him. The Biden properties in Maryland got very valuable after Biden bought them

GratefulApe

So it's not Maryland its Delaware where Biden spent the entire presidential campaign in his basement. Probably overlooking the Potomac. He's still gazing at the horses and remembering the old Stanchions.

Emma286

Didn't long find and finish reading this:

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/patient-zero/

Imho it's pretty good!
"If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed."

Albert Einstein

Dexter

Just finished Gravity's Rainbow. I think I will try another Pynchon but not V just yet. Maybe Crying of Lot 49.
"Here is no water but only rock
Rock and no water and the sandy road"
― T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

kevin

was it as weird as they say?
dare to know.

maritime

#1190
Tapestries of sound
QuoteGlenn Gould's radio documentaries are still mesmerising

Listen to his ground-breaking "Solitude Trilogy" in a quiet moment of peace

In his early 30s and at the height of his powers, Glenn Gould announced in 1964 that he was retiring from public performance. Classical-music enthusiasts were stunned. Less than a decade before, the maverick pianist had delighted fans with his authoritative recording of J.S. Bach's "Goldberg Variations". Now, he declared, "the concert is dead". In 1965 he accepted a job with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (cbc) and rode the Muskeg Express as far as it would go, from Winnipeg to Churchill, Manitoba.

On the train, Gould struck up a conversation with Wally Maclean, a retired surveyor who combined a homespun folksiness with the soul of a philosopher. Over breakfast Maclean taught Gould how to read the signs of the icy land, to find "in the most minute measurement a suggestion of the infinite". The cordial chat turned into a days-long, probing conversation.

Gould adapted this material into "The Idea of North", a radio documentary exploring Canada's ambivalent relationship with its northern frontier, which the cbc aired in 1967. It was the first of three experimental audio documentaries he produced about choosing to live apart: "The Latecomers", about Newfoundland, was broadcast in 1969 and "The Quiet in the Land", which chronicles a Mennonite community, was released in 1977. Gould would later call the shows his "Solitude Trilogy".

The theme of isolation resonates again in the wake of the pandemic. What is more surprising is how fresh and experimental the programmes themselves sound, even in the high-tech, peak-podcast era. (They are available to stream via Spotify, Amazon and the cbc's own website.) Take "The Idea of North", in which Gould arranged the voices of four main characters into a single fugue. A technician recalled being handed a diagram by Gould, outlining which clips should be heard when; he was "orchestrating the voices" on the page.

Gould thought that, in broadcasting, fidelity to a single human voice was "nonsense", maintaining that "the average person can take in and respond to far more information than we allot him on most occasions." He championed a layered form—thinking of it in musical terms, as "contrapuntal"—and experimented with it further in "The Latecomers" and "The Quiet in the Land". By the late 1960s the cbc had switched from monaural to stereo sound, and editors were able to weave voices into a delicate sonic tapestry.

The formal daring did not just make use of technical advances: it created a sublime listening experience. At the end of "The Idea of North", Gould sets Maclean's musings to the final movement of the Fifth Symphony by Jean Sibelius, a Finnish composer who also withdrew from public life. Reflecting on "The Moral Equivalent of War", an essay by William James, Maclean suggests that, in its arduous extremity, going north is, for Canadians, the modern equivalent of conflict.

The trilogy is a masterwork of sonic innovation. It redefined the radio documentary and influenced generations of audio storytellers. Listen to it on a train—or in any moment of blissful solitude.


Better, audio only
North Star Polaris Sept 26, 2021 photo by JE

Dexter

Quote from: kevin on April 17, 2022, 12:20:57 PMwas it as weird as they say?
Not weird but a bit intellectually pretentious.
"Here is no water but only rock
Rock and no water and the sandy road"
― T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

Emma286

Quote from: Dexter on April 17, 2022, 12:17:05 PMJust finished Gravity's Rainbow. I think I will try another Pynchon but not V just yet. Maybe Crying of Lot 49.
Quote from: Dexter on April 18, 2022, 11:26:17 AM
Quote from: kevin on April 17, 2022, 12:20:57 PMwas it as weird as they say?
Not weird but a bit intellectually pretentious.

Would you say it was also obscene in parts? Read on Wikipedia it's been said to be!
"If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed."

Albert Einstein

Dexter

Quote from: Emma286 on April 23, 2022, 01:04:26 PM
Quote from: Dexter on April 17, 2022, 12:17:05 PMJust finished Gravity's Rainbow. I think I will try another Pynchon but not V just yet. Maybe Crying of Lot 49.
Quote from: Dexter on April 18, 2022, 11:26:17 AM
Quote from: kevin on April 17, 2022, 12:20:57 PMwas it as weird as they say?
Not weird but a bit intellectually pretentious.

Would you say it was also obscene in parts? Read on Wikipedia it's been said to be!
Yes there was a particularly obscene part, which I am not sure was necessary. I think it was used to demonstrate the mental state of a lesser character (in terms of the plot).
"Here is no water but only rock
Rock and no water and the sandy road"
― T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

none

Anybody reed a book on why the mother has to survive?
how long after I type amen do I get the money?
I'm lost, if you see me you are lost also
If Jesus believed in himself he wouldn't have been Jewish.

maritime

https://www.economist.com/obituary/2022/05/14/ron-galella-the-original-paparazzo-died-on-april-30th-aged-91

QuoteRon Galella, the original paparazzo, died on April 30th, aged 91
The snapper to the stars was best known for his run-ins with Jackie Kennedy

Some photographers use studios, and assistants to help with the lighting. Ron Galella had a method, a method he believed in so deeply it amounted to a creed: learn to crash events, find out where the kitchen is (useful for sneaking in), never check your coat, shoot fast and always hold the camera in front of your chest. If you hold it up and look through the lens, you don't see the eyes. What you need is eye contact. Eye-to-eye, person to person, he liked to say, that's how you get the real McCoy.

He wasn't always so confident. He grew up in the North Bronx, with an accent as thick as provolone. From his father, an immigrant from Italy who made coffins and piano cases and never really learned to speak English, he learned to be tight with money. His American-born mother longed for the glamour she saw in the movies, and named her son after a film star. Both chippy in their own way, his parents fought all the time. His main comfort was a pet rabbit, until his father cooked it in a stew.

It was the air force that give him his first break, during the Korean war, when he signed up for photography lessons while learning about camera repair. Soon he was shooting visiting celebrities for the base newspaper. After he was discharged in 1955 the GI Bill helped him through art school in California. He began photographing actors at premieres and parties in his spare time to make extra money.

He was lucky with timing. In 1960 Federico Fellini's "La Dolce Vita" introduced the world to a photographer named Paparazzo. The filming of "Cleopatra" in Rome shortly afterwards fuelled demand for celebrity snaps as its two stars, Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, embarked on an adulterous affair that scandalised the Vatican and made headlines across the Atlantic. The young camera repairer, fresh out of the air force, quickly learned that his part-time gig could become a lifelong career.

He became adept at catching stars with their guard down: Greta Garbo coming out of her apartment, face hidden in a handkerchief; John Lennon and Mick Jagger sharing a smoke; Mick Jagger again, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen sharing a mic; Gina Lollobrigida coming profile-to-profile with Michelangelo's David. He bribed a watchman to lock him in a ratty Thameside warehouse one weekend so he could spy on Taylor and Burton squabbling over breakfast aboard their yacht, Kalizma, after they put up gauze curtains around the deck to ensure their privacy. What made him famous wasn't his photographs, but the subjects he photographed. Andy Warhol, who saw him in the same way he saw himself, as a lonely outsider craving to be let in, called it "being in the right place at the wrong time".

Some didn't mind being caught at the wrong time or having their privacy invaded. It gave them exposure and meant they were on the up. But many did. Elaine, a famed New York restaurateur, tried to hit him with a dustbin lid. Sean Penn spat at him. Marlon Brando punched him in the jaw, knocking five of his teeth out.

There was no one he pursued like he pursued Jackie Kennedy. She was mysterious, elusive—and gloriously photogenic. He hid behind the coat-check when she went to a restaurant and followed her to her seat when she was at the theatre, he boasted in "Smash His Camera", a documentary. Almost every day he lurked outside her apartment building at 1040 Fifth Avenue, and once even followed her to a Greek island where, dressed up as a sailor, he took pictures of her on holiday. He dated her maid to pump her for information, until she got the sack. Asked about the Jackie fixation, he said he was unattached at the time and saw her as his golden girl, his girl friend (in a way). When he did eventually marry, it was to a woman whose voice reminded him of Jackie's.

In all the years he shot Kennedy, he always said his best streak came in early October 1971. On October 4th he snapped her watching her daughter playing tennis in Central Park. The next day she went shopping at Bonwit Teller. On October 6th he caught her at the corner of 85th Street and Fifth Avenue and later at the New York Public Library. On October 7th he'd just finished some portfolio shots for a model when he saw her coming out of the side entrance of her building. It was late in the afternoon, with a blue sky and a light breeze. Perfect soft Manhattan light, he called it. As she turned onto Madison Avenue, he hopped in a cab. At the honk of a horn she suddenly looked up, and he got what he would always call his Mona Lisa shot, "Windswept Jackie", with her hair blowing across her face and just the beginnings of a smile.

The smiling didn't last, of course. As soon as she recognised him, she hid behind her sunglasses. Two months later she sued him. Life magazine ran a cover story with the headline, "Jackie and the Jackie-Watcher". He was ruining her life, she told the court. She had no peace, no peace of mind, she said. She was always under surveillance, imprisoned in her own house. The judge agreed, and ordered that he respect a no-go zone around the former First Lady and her children. When he broke the embargo repeatedly, the court threatened him with jail.

His pictures, and the way he got them, spawned an industry that came to see celebrities as prey to be hounded. His photographs are now in the Museum of Modern Art. "Windswept Jackie" is his most popular, and most expensive, print. The trial made him famous—and rich enough to build a mansion in New Jersey with a photo gallery covering one entire floor, a basement archive for the 3m pictures taken over half a century and a cemetery in the garden for the pet rabbits he still loved from childhood.

If before the trial he was regarded as a gadfly, afterwards many saw him as a pest. When it ended he received an anonymous letter: "You are a rat...I pray that you get paid back for the misery you are causing a woman who has gone through hell, a hell caused by another maniac like you. You are stupid, monstrous and slimy. You should be deported to an island to rot." When Kennedy died, he headed one last time to 1040 Fifth Avenue. He took no pictures that day; just paid his respects.
North Star Polaris Sept 26, 2021 photo by JE

Dexter

Just finished The crying of Lot 49
"Here is no water but only rock
Rock and no water and the sandy road"
― T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

maritime

More than 1/2 way thru One Damn Thing After Another. Great book, insightful.

Started Projections by Karl Deisseroth...Storehouse of Tears was a puzzling chapter, got me to thinking what chokes me up and what does not, and why.

Looking through Leave No Trace, The Vanishing North American Wilderness, aerial photography by Jim Wark. There are essays by Roderick F Nash but haven't read those yet.
North Star Polaris Sept 26, 2021 photo by JE

maritime

Upstream, Mary Oliver
North Star Polaris Sept 26, 2021 photo by JE

leese

Last Night in Twisted River
-John Irving



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