Author Topic: What are you reading now?  (Read 59244 times)  Share 

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Offline acctnt_shan

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #840 on: December 03, 2015, 03:52:07 AM »
The Nightingale
Every man is a damn fool for at least five minutes every day; wisdom consists in not exceeding the limit. ~Elbert Hubbard

Offline Meat

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #841 on: December 03, 2015, 04:03:06 AM »
Wait. Acct Shan is here?  OMG! :D
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Offline acctnt_shan

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #842 on: December 21, 2015, 05:21:01 PM »
 ||grin||
Every man is a damn fool for at least five minutes every day; wisdom consists in not exceeding the limit. ~Elbert Hubbard

Offline Nam

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #843 on: December 21, 2015, 11:46:24 PM »
Ballads, lyrics, and hymns. (1866) By Alice Cary

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I'm on the road less traveled...

Creationism is the Hollywood version of Evolution - Nam

Offline Dexter

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #844 on: January 21, 2016, 07:21:13 AM »
Just finished "Olivier and Parrot in America" by Peter Carey and am now well into "A Confederacy of Dunces" by John Kennedy Toole.
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."-the Amendment that ensures nobody is safe..

Offline acctnt_shan

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #845 on: February 12, 2016, 01:29:29 AM »
The Warded Man by Peter Brett
Every man is a damn fool for at least five minutes every day; wisdom consists in not exceeding the limit. ~Elbert Hubbard

Offline Dexter

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #846 on: February 12, 2016, 10:41:39 AM »
The Warded Man by Peter Brett

I read that, and the sequel, and the next one. I even read the between short stories.

@acctnt_shan
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."-the Amendment that ensures nobody is safe..

Offline Teaspoon Shallow

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #847 on: February 26, 2016, 05:08:06 AM »
How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age 7th Edition

I am 1/10th of the into it but cannot wait to pick it up again.

A few small criticisms include font size.  I have 20/20 eyesight but this is just ridiculously small.
Also it is not a simple page turner, there are multiple additions that make it a little hard to follow if you do not pay attention to the different fonts.  this would not be so hard if the text was larger than 2.2mm for a capital.  (12pt is approximately 4.5mm or 3/16 so this is about half that size).

http://www.amazon.com/How-Think-About-Weird-Things/dp/0078038367
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Offline Nam

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #848 on: February 27, 2016, 06:17:55 PM »
Ballads, lyrics, and hymns. (1866) By Alice Cary

-Nam

Still reading this. On page 116. I read a poem or two once a week.

-Nam
I'm on the road less traveled...

Creationism is the Hollywood version of Evolution - Nam

Offline Boots

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #849 on: March 01, 2016, 10:19:59 PM »
one of my friends is suggesting a re-reading of The Dark Tower, in anticipation of the upcoming Gunslinger movie.  Not sure whether I'll do that yet...I'm currently on Book 2 of A Song of Ice And Fire.
Religion=institutionalized superstition

Apologetics=the art of making s**t up to make other made-up s**t sound more plausible

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Offline Teaspoon Shallow

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #850 on: March 01, 2016, 11:28:12 PM »
Just looked that one up.  Any good?
"If I could stop a person from raping a child, I would.    That’s the difference between me and your God." Tracie Harris

Offline Boots

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #851 on: March 02, 2016, 03:35:16 PM »
Just looked that one up.  Any good?

I named two, so since I don't know which you're referring to...

Dark Tower--YES.   Highly recommended.  It's a really good blend of old west & magic & a smattering of horror (what King does best).  There are definite weirdnesses in it that I didn't buy into until I read it a second time (and i can't give away without major spoilers)

Song of Ice and Fire--so far, pretty good.  Decent characterization.  The HBO Game of Thrones (which is the name of the first book--technically "A Game Of Thrones") has been called "an excellent adaptation of a mediocre series" which I think is just a little harsh :-)
Religion=institutionalized superstition

Apologetics=the art of making s**t up to make other made-up s**t sound more plausible

"To not believe in god is to know that it falls to us to make the world a better place."

~Sam Harris

Offline Teaspoon Shallow

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #852 on: March 02, 2016, 09:09:52 PM »
Game of thrones (TV series) is awesome.  One of 4 shows a year I watch.
"If I could stop a person from raping a child, I would.    That’s the difference between me and your God." Tracie Harris

Offline acctnt_shan

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #853 on: March 08, 2016, 01:29:25 AM »
The Warded Man by Peter Brett

Still this... hit a speed bump when I forgot it at a friend's house a couple weeks ago... but REALLY enjoying it!
Every man is a damn fool for at least five minutes every day; wisdom consists in not exceeding the limit. ~Elbert Hubbard

Offline maritime

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #854 on: March 09, 2016, 05:35:16 PM »
Nuclear Iran by J Bernstein
A New Birth of Freedom by H V Jaffa
Traveling to Infinity J Hawking

started and set aside, and restarted (now at pg 303) A New Birth of Freedom by Harry V Jaffa -- highly recommend this book to AssyrianKey re slavery and insights highlighted in/of the life and times of Abraham Lincoln et al

finished recently In Defense of People by Richard Neuhaus, reread Help by Garrett Keizer, and more; continue to read obits and other articles of interest in The Economist

hello all
"Only the human mind is designed to work this way, programmed to drift away in the presence of locked-on information, straying from each point in a hunt for a better, different point." L Thomas, TLoaC

Offline Dexter

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #855 on: March 09, 2016, 10:43:10 PM »
Hi Maritime
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."-the Amendment that ensures nobody is safe..

Offline Luigi

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #856 on: March 29, 2016, 04:09:59 AM »
Go Set a Watchman. To Kill a Mockingbird is my favorite book so I figured I'd read Lee's second novel.
Lord, please give me patience because if you give me strength, I may just beat someone to death.

Offline Emma286

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #857 on: November 18, 2016, 06:29:13 PM »
Currently making my way through "Industrial Magic" by Kelley Armstrong

Need to go back to reading "Bitten" by the same author at some stage after reading this. I started reading that one before and then never finished it.

Plan to read "Jude the Obscure" by Thomas Hardy next after this.

After that, would really like to read "Great Expectations by Charles D**kens" and "Tess of the d'Urbervilles" by Thomas Hardy, as find the sound of them interesting. It's likely I can get hold of a couple of cheap copies of them in the fairly near future.

Should keep me busy, reading wise, for a while.
"If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed."

Albert Einstein

Offline Futurist

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #858 on: November 22, 2016, 03:07:40 AM »
Just getting ready to start "Between the World and Me" by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Offline Hemingway

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #859 on: January 11, 2017, 02:05:17 PM »


My mam gave me the softback edition of this last Sunday. Might get a start on it this weekend!  ||minicat||
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Offline Shawna

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #860 on: January 11, 2017, 02:10:19 PM »
Listening to Eckhart Tolle read his book,  "A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose."

Really good.
“I think, indeed, that the goodness of God, through His Christ, may recall all His creatures to one end.”
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Offline Futurist

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #861 on: February 03, 2017, 02:18:06 PM »
Just Mercy: A Story of Forgiveness and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson. A very power book. I actually paused reading of Between the Workd and Me to read this. It made Coates's book much more meaningful to me.

Offline Dexter

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #862 on: February 03, 2017, 08:38:36 PM »
The Brendan Voyage by Tim Severin.
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."-the Amendment that ensures nobody is safe..

Offline eyeshaveit

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #863 on: February 09, 2017, 08:17:06 AM »
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

(Some excerpts from Douglass' autobiography - written and published in 1845 - several years before the anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin appeared - and long before the Civil War began. The last two paragraphs reveals the hypocritical nature of many Christian slave-holders during those times)

"I was seldom whipped by my old master, and suffered little from any thing else than hunger and cold. I suffered much from hunger, but much more from cold. In hottest summer and coldest winter, I was kept almost naked--no shoes, no stockings, no jacket, no trousers, nothing on but a coarse tow linen shirt, reaching only to my knees. I had no bed. I must have perished with cold, but that, the coldest nights, I used to steal a bag which was used for carrying corn to the mill. I would crawl into this bag, and there sleep on the cold, damp, clay floor, with my head in and feet out. My feet have been so cracked with the frost, that the pen with which I am writing might be laid in the gashes.
       
"We were not regularly allowanced. Our food was coarse corn meal boiled. This was called mush. It was put into a large wooden tray or trough, and set down upon the ground. The children were then called, like so many pigs, and like so many pigs they would come and devour the mush; some with oyster-shells, others with pieces of shingle, some with naked hands, and none with spoons. He that ate fastest got most; he that was strongest secured the best place; and few left the trough satisfied.
       
"I was probably between seven and eight years old when I left Colonel Lloyd's plantation. I left it with joy. I shall never forget the ecstasy with which I received the intelligence that my old master (Anthony) had determined to let me go to Baltimore, to live with Mr. Hugh Auld, brother to my old master's son-in-law, Captain Thomas Auld. I received this information about three days before my departure. They were three of the happiest days I ever enjoyed. I spent the most part of all these three days in the creek, washing off the plantation scurf, and preparing myself for my departure.

...

"I lived with Mr. Covey one year. During the first six months, of that year, scarce a week passed without his whipping me. I was seldom free from a sore back. My awkwardness was almost always his excuse for whipping me. We were worked fully up to the point of endurance. Long before day we were up, our horses fed, and by the first approach of day we were off to the field with our hoes and ploughing teams. Mr. Covey gave us enough to eat, but scarce time to eat it. We were often less than five minutes taking our meals. We were often in the field from the first approach of day till its last lingering ray had left us; and at saving-fodder time, midnight often caught us in the field binding blades.

...

"Mr. Covey was at the house, about one hundred yards from the treading-yard where we were fanning. On hearing the fan stop, he left immediately, and came to the spot where we were. He hastily inquired what the matter was. Bill answered that I was sick, and there was no one to bring wheat to the fan. I had by this time crawled away under the side of the post and rail-fence by which the yard was enclosed, hoping to find relief by getting out of the sun. He then asked where I was. He was told by one of the hands. He came to the spot, and, after looking at me awhile, asked me what was the matter. I told him as well as I could, for I scarce had strength to speak.

"He then gave me a savage kick in the side, and told me to get up. I tried to do so, but fell back in the attempt. He gave me another kick, and again told me to rise. I again tried, and succeeded in gaining my feet; but, stooping to get the tub with which I was feeding the fan, I again staggered and fell. While down in this situation, Mr. Covey took up the hickory slat with which Hughes had been striking off the half-bushel measure, and with it gave me a heavy blow upon the head, making a large wound, and the blood ran freely; and with this again told me to get up. I made no effort to comply, having now made up my mind to let him do his worst. In a short time after receiving this blow, my head grew better. Mr. Covey had now left me to my fate

...

"My situation was a most trying one. At times I needed a dozen pair of hands. I was called a dozen ways in the space of a single minute. Three or four voices would strike my ear at the same moment. It was--"Fred., come help me to cant this timber here."--"Fred., come carry this timber yonder."--"Fred., bring that roller here."--"Fred., go get a fresh can of water."-- "Fred., come help saw off the end of this timber."-- "Fred., go quick, and get the crowbar."--"Fred., hold on the end of this fall."--"Fred., go to the blacksmith's shop, and get a new punch." -- "Hurra, Fred.! run and bring me a cold chisel."--"I say, Fred., bear a hand, and get up a fire as quick as lightning under that steam-box." -- "Halloo, n****r! come, turn this grindstone."--"Come, come! move, move! and bowse this timber forward."--"I say, darky, blast your eyes, why don't you heat up some pitch?"-- "Halloo! halloo! halloo!" (Three voices at the same time.) "Come here!--Go there!--Hold on where you are! Damn you, if you move, I'll knock your brains out!"

...

"I hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of the land. . . . I look upon it as the climax of all misnomers, the boldest of all frauds, and the grossest of all libels. . . .I am filled with unutterable loathing when I contemplate the religious pomp and show, together with the horrible inconsistencies, which every where surround me. We have men-stealers for ministers, women-whippers for missionaries, and cradle-plunderers for church members. The man who wields the blood-clotted cowskin during the week fills the pulpit on Sunday, and claims to be a minister of the meek and lowly Jesus. . . .

"The slave auctioneer’s bell and the church-going bell chime in with each other, and the bitter cries of the heart-broken slave are drowned in the religious shouts of his pious master. Revivals of religion and revivals in the slave-trade go hand in hand together. The slave prison and the church stand near each other. The clanking of fetters and the rattling of chains in the prison, and the pious psalm and solemn prayer in the church, may be heard at the same time. The dealers in the bodies of men erect their stand in the presence of the pulpit, and they mutually help each other. The dealer gives his blood-stained gold to support the pulpit, and the pulpit, in return, covers his infernal business with the garb of Christianity. Here we have religion and robbery the allies of each other—devils dressed in angels’ robes, and hell presenting the semblance of paradise."

Read Douglass' e-book here:

http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/douglass/douglass.html

Offline Emma286

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #864 on: March 28, 2017, 01:36:45 PM »
I've started to get distracted with Stephen King's "Rose Madder." I've taken the odd casual peek at it before but never read it all the way through. In recent days, did the same but this time have been feeling strongly drawn into the story. Now I'm really wanting to read it properly! Thinking I'm going to give the other one a break and go with this one for now. The other one isn't bad imo (so far) but this one is interesting me far more!
"If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed."

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Offline Dexter

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #865 on: March 28, 2017, 08:55:31 PM »
Recently read One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and 1984 by George Orwell.
Currently reading The Last World by Christoph Ransmahr.
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."-the Amendment that ensures nobody is safe..

Offline Garja

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Re: What are you reading now?
« Reply #866 on: Yesterday at 06:21:24 PM »
Uptown Sinclair's "The Jungle".
I'm seeing why it's considered a classic!


Should be required reading for our libertarian friends.
“Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, then that of blindfolded fear.”
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